Among computer programmers, there are many that could rightly be called the “incarnation of geeks” – people that jump at the opportunity to obtain the latest gadgets. To them, updating their computer peripherals is about more than just making their work more efficient.

 

The keyboards, headphones, and each and every item surrounding programmers’ desk environments is a reflection of their lifestyles.

 

We spoke with Jesse Vincent, a leading programmer known for his work in Perl. He had the unexpected idea to create a keyboard out of none other than wood.

 

The Keyboardio is a wooden keyboard targeting hardcore computer users. We sat down with Vincent and his wife, a co-founder of the company, and learned about what went into the development of the product and how their “road trip” to focus test the product on actual users went.

11822292_10153460036938686_2437135926846610248_n

 

A design spontaneously born out of research

 

——A wooden keyboard is quite a novel idea. Where did the inspiration come from?

 

Jesse Vincent:

It’s actually an interesting story. The fact that it’s wooden happened totally by accident.

 

When we made the first prototype, I was living in Boston. I went to a shop with a laser cutter in order to prep a prototype to show at an appointment we had with a potential client. However, we ran into a problem: it was the dead of winter. I had ordered acrylic plastic, but there was a blizzard, and the material didn’t arrive on time.

 

——Terrible. So what did you do?

 

Vincent: I didn’t want to lose the opportunity for the meeting, so I went to a local lumber shop and bought up plywood and used that instead. I was surprised to find that the result was even better than plastic.

 

Wood has a warmth that puts the user at ease. It was like the keyboard had had new life breathed into it. This was really unexpected.

 

——An unplanned accident actually created the best result. Another unique aspect of the Keyboardio is its butterfly-like design. Tell us about how you devised this layout.

 

Vincent: We prototyped over thirty different designs. One project that we used as a reference early on was work done by the University of Tokyo. That project looked at the usability of computer equipment, and they designed a keyboard based on how people actually use their hands. Instead of a rectangle, the design was spread out like wings. We used this as a hint in our prototype, arranging the keys and the perimeter of the keyboard in a butterfly shape. People really liked this design and found it comfortable to use.

 

Most keyboards are clinical, almost like medical devices. They’re awkward and unfamiliar. We want to create something more appealing and fun.

A project launched as a couple

——We want to ask you about the team members and how you approached recruiting. You started as a husband-and-wife team.

 

Vincent: I originally thought this keyboard project was going to be a personal thing that took a month at most. However, I was surprised to find that lots of people wanted to know where to buy the product.

 

I told my wife, who was completing an MBA, about it, and she said, “If there are this many people that want to buy it, it means there’s a real need for it – can’t we make this into a business?” That’s how the project started.

 

My wife is now in charge of the business side of things, which is her forte. It’s not my personal strength, so we have a great synergy.

 

Jesse_and_Kaia_with_prototypes

——How did you get people to collaborate with you on the project?

 

Vincent: In general, we relied on introductions and recommendations from friends and acquaintances. In addition to the two of us, we have mechanical and electrical engineers, and they are hired on a contract basis.

 

San Francisco is home to major firms like Google and Apple that hire engineers, so there is lots of great talent being scooped up elsewhere. Finding good members and building a team is difficult. You have to have the funds to pay their wages and you have to find people interested in working on what you’re working on.

 

At the same time, we had help from a lot of volunteers. I think this is owed to the fact that we are providing our idea in an open-source format, so people were enthusiastic about collaborating with us.

 

The road trip campaign

 

——Let’s talk about fundraising. You used Kickstarter for initial pre-orders of the product.

 

Vincent: There are lots of great crowd-funding sites in the US, like Kickstarter and Indiegogo. Using these platforms is extremely useful for hardware startups – the reason being that using crowd-funding lets you gauge the initial scale of your market. Will the initial volume of units shipped be in the hundreds or thousands? This data lets you talk specifics with the factories and make decisions on what technology you will use to make the product.

 

—— In 30 days, Keyboardio raised over 600,00 USD and over 2,000 supporters. We heard that you and Kaia (Dekker) visited numerous cities during the campaign.

 

Vincent: That’s right. During the thirty days of the Kickstarter campaign, we went on a road trip spanning the US and visited hacker spaces in twenty-five cities.

 

The germ of this idea was in the fact that we wanted to put to use the car we had sitting unused since moving to Boston. We decided that we might as well go for two or three cities and try showing the keyboard to others.

 

Before the campaign went live, we sent out a post on our mailing list asking if there were people who wanted us to come and visit. We got responses from over a hundred people in fifty cities. We checked them on a map, and they were mostly within driving distance. So we ended up driving 8-10 hours each day, giving our supporters feedback on our travel status, and then hitting the sack before setting off the next day.

 

We got lots of feedback on this trip and learned that there was still much we could do to improve the product.

 

unspecified

 

——What specifically did you learn on the trip?

 

Vincent: On Kickstarter, we only offered a quiet version intended for use in offices. On the road trip, we got lots of requests from people about the sound of the keys. It turns out that a lot of people who are picky about their keyboards prefer keys that rattle off a sound almost like a machine gun.

 

Fortunately, changing the sound simply came down to swapping out some mechanical switches, so we were able to incorporate this idea and offer a clicky version for an extra ten dollars.

 

——That’s a small but valuable piece of feedback. Lastly, what are your near-term goals and vision?

 

Vincent: Our near-term goals revolve around delivering high-quality products to users in a timely fashion. In the long-term, we want to bring excellent new input devices to the market that are more well-designed and functional than anything else out there. We want to make this a device that acts as users’ trusty ally when working on their computers. We are currently drafting new designs which, while not yet to our liking, will be something we want to share with everyone once they’re ready.

 

There is still much that can be done to refine input devices, and we have lots of ideas. We want to keep focusing on keyboards as we grow.

 

 


Postscript

For programmers, a keyboard is like an extension of their own limbs. The Keyboardio, with its organic materials and design based on bionics, is like something out of a dream for users who spend long hours typing on their keyboards.

 

The Vincents, poised to bring the Keyboardio to the world, struck us as engaged in creating something that is like an everyday T-shirt: a perennial classic that will last for years to come.

 

What came across in this interview is that craftsmanship, yesterday, today, and in the future, is always something that unfolds closely rooted to the lifestyles of the producers.


コンピューター・プログラマーの中には、最新ガジェットに真っ先に飛びつく「ギークの権化」と言えるような人たちが多数存在しています。彼らにとって、PC周りの機器を新調することは仕事の効率化のみを目的としているわけではありません。

キーボードやヘッドホン、さらにはPCデスクや椅子の一つ一つにいたるまで、プログラマーを取り巻くモノたちは、彼らのこだわりやライフスタイルをそのまま映し出してもいるのです。

今回インタビューを行ったジェシー・ヴィンセント氏は、Perl言語に関する功績でも知られる第一線のプログラマーでした。そんなヴィンセント氏が、「木」を素材にキーボードを製作したら……?

PCのヘビーユーザーをターゲットに製作された木製キーボード、Keyboardioの開発背景から、共同創業者である奥様とのユーザーヒアリングのためのロードトリップまでお話を伺いました。

11822292_10153460036938686_2437135926846610248_n

 

偶然と研究が生んだデザイン

——木製のキーボードは非常に斬新なアイデアだと思うのですが、この着想はどこから生まれたのでしょうか?

 

ジェシー・ヴィンセント氏(以下、ヴィンセント):

実はそれには面白い話があって、木製のキーボードを作ることになったのはまったくの偶然の出来事だったんです。

初期のプロトタイプを作成していたとき、私はアメリカのボストンに住んでいました。プロトタイプを作成して渡すというアポイントのために、レーザーカッターを使わせてくれるお店で作業をしていたのです。しかし、問題が発生しました。季節は冬の真っ只中。アクリルのプラスチックを注文していたのですが、外は吹雪でひどい嵐だったので注文したものが届かなかったのです。

 

——それは大変でしたね。どう対処されたのですか?

 

ヴィンセント:アポイントを逃したくなかったので、地元の材木屋にいき、ベニヤ板を買ってきてこれを代わりにして作ってみたんです。そしたらプラスチックのものよりも良いものが出来上がって、驚きました。

木を使うことで気持ちを暖かくさせるような、生命が吹き込まれたような感じになったのです。まさに偶然の出来事ですね。

 

——アクシデントが、最良の結果を生むことになったのですね。ところで、Keyboardioは素材だけでなく蝶のようなデザインも非常に特徴的です。このデザインにたどり着いた経緯について教えて下さい。

 

ヴィンセント:デザインは、今まで30以上のプロトタイプを作成しました。最初のころのプロトタイプで参考にしたのは、東京大学のプロジェクトです。コンピューターの使用感について研究したそのプロジェクトの中では、「人がどのように手を使うか」という研究に基づいてキーボードがデザインそれていました。そのデザインが長方形ではなく翼のようなものになっているものだったので、これを参考にして、自分たちのプロトタイプでも、キー配列やキーボードの周りをバタフライ型のデザインにしたのです。人々はこのデザインをとても気に入り、心地よいと感じてくれました。

大半のキーボードはまるで医療器具のようで、親しみを感じにくい。そうではなく、自分たちは、何かもっと魅力的で楽しいと感じてもらえるようなものにしたいと思ったのです。

 

夫婦で開始したプロジェクト

——では続いて、チームメンバー・人材集めについての質問に移ります。最初はご夫婦で始められたということですが……。

 

ヴィンセント:もともと、キーボード作りの取り組みは1ヶ月だけの個人的なプロジェクトの予定でした。ただ、驚いたことに、カフェなどで作業をしているときに、たくさんの人がこのキーボードはどこで購入できるのか、と尋ねてきたのです。

その話を当時、MBAの課程を終えようとしていた妻に伝えたら、「こんなに多くの人がこれを買いたいと言っているということは、そこにニーズがあるし、ビジネスにできるのではないか」と言ってくれたんです。これがプロジェクトの始まりでしたね。

現在、妻は得意なビジネス分野を担当しています。自分はこの分野は苦手なので、非常に良い関係を築けていると思います。

 

——プロジェクトの協力者はどのようにして集められたのですか?

 

ヴィンセント:人材を見つけるときのだいたいのパターンとしては、友人や知り合いのグループの人たちの紹介や推薦ですね。現在、私たち夫婦のほかにはメカニカルエンジニアやエレクトリカルエンジニアがいますが、彼らは契約ベースでのメンバーです。

GoogleやAppleなどの大企業もエンジニアを採用しているサンフランシスコにおいて、良い人材を見つけて、チームに引き寄せるのはとても難しいことです。その人材に支払うことの出来る金額で、自分たちと一緒に働くことに興味を持ってもらう必要があります。

しかし、今までたくさんの人がボランティアで手伝ってくれました。これは、自分たちがオープンソースで提供しているアイデアにわくわくする人がいるからだと思います。

Jesse_and_Kaia_with_prototypes

 

ロードトリップ・キャンペーン

——では資金調達の話に移ります。Keyboardioの予約販売ではKickstarterを利用されたのですね。

 

ヴィンセント:アメリカでは、KickstarterやIndiegogoをはじめ、良いクラウドファンディングサイトがたくさんあります。これらのクラウドファンディングを利用することはハードウェアスタートアップにとって大変意味のあることだと思います。

なぜなら、クラウドファンディングによって初期の規模感をつかむことができたからです。初期の発送ボリュームが数百程度なのか、それとも数千単位になるのかが把握できたので、製造工場と具体的に話ができ、製造技術に関する決断も可能になりました。

 

——Keyboardioは30日間で2000人以上のサポーターと60万ドル以上の資金の支援を受けました。このキャンペーンの期間中、デッカーさんは様々な都市を訪れていたと聞きました。

 

ヴィンセント:はい。Kickstarterでの30日間のキャンペーンの間に、私たちはアメリカを横断するロードトリップを行い、25都市のハッカーズベースを訪れました。

引越しの時にボストンに置いてきた車を移動させようとしたのが、そもそものきっかけです。それで、せっかくなら2、3の都市に立ち寄って自分たちのキーボードを見せたら面白いんじゃないかと思ったんです。

そこで、キャンペーンが始まる前に、メーリングリストに「誰か自分たちに来てほしいひとはいるか」というポストをしました。そうしたら、50以上の都市の100人以上の人から返答があって。地図でその場所を確認してみたら、大半の場所には行けそうでした。なので、この旅の間は8〜10時間くらい毎日ドライブをして、旅の詳細をサポーターたちに知らせて、また眠って次の日出発して……という風に過ごしました。

この旅の間に多くのフィードバックをもらって、製品の改善のためにまだまだ沢山できることがあると気付かされましたね。

unspecified

 

——具体的に、ロードトリップでの意見が参考にした点を教えていただけますか?

 

ヴィンセント:Kickstarterでは、オフィスでの使用に適した静かなバージョンのみを提供していました。しかし、ロードトリップではたくさんの人からキーボード音についての問い合わせをもらいました。キーボードにこだわりのある人は、マシンガンのように音が出るパターンのものを好む場合が多かったのです。

幸い、音が出るバージョンに変えるためにはメカニカルキースイッチを替えるだけでしたので、この意見を取り入れて、プラス10ドルを支払えばこのバージョンが手に入るようにしました。

 

——小さいながらも重要なフィードバックですね。では最後に、これからの展望として、直近のゴールやビジョンがあれば教えてください。

 

ヴィンセント:直近のゴールは、質の高い製品をきちんとした時期にユーザーに届けることです。より長いスパンで目指していることは、デザイン性の高い、よりよいインプットデバイスをつくること。そして、そのデバイスをユーザーがPCワークを行う上でのとっておきの相方にすることです。今、新しいデザインを作成しており、現段階では満足できるものではないですが、良いものが出来たらすぐにシェアしたいです。

インプットデバイスという素材には、まだまだできることがいっぱいあり、やってみたいことがたくさんあります。これからもキーボードにフォーカス続けていきたいです。

 


編集後記

プログラマーにとってキーボードとは体の延長のようなデバイス。生体工学に基づいたデザインとオーガニックな素材を同時に用いたKeyboardioは、日頃長時間キーボードに入力作業を繰り返すユーザーにとっては夢にまで見たようなプロダクトと言えるでしょう。

そんなKeyboardioを世に送り出そうとしているヴィンセントさんご夫婦からは、まるで普段着のTシャツを着るような感覚でプロジェクトに取り組まれているという印象を受けました。

いつの時代も、ものづくりは生活と地続きの場所で行われている。そう考えさせてくれるインタビューでした。